Wednesday, June 4, 2014

INNATE OR NOT?

by Kathy Cannon Wiechman
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As a kid, I listened to Cincinnati Reds baseball games with my dad. I asked questions, and he answered. That bond with my father is what made me a Reds fan.

I listened to what announcers said about the players—including Pete Rose. No matter what else he has done, he still holds the record for most hits ever, having passed Ty Cobb in 1985.

What you may not know about Pete is that he was never considered to have “natural ability.” He became the all-time hits king in spite of this so-called lack of talent. He loved baseball and wanted to play. He threw himself into the sport 100%. He took extra batting practice. He studied the pitchers to anticipate what they would throw him. His hard work made up for what he lacked innately. Did it ever!

But baseball and Pete Rose are not my topic today.

My topic is Voice, a necessity in successful writing. Experts say Voice can’t be taught. You have it or you don’t. I was told I have it. For that, I am grateful. But what if I’d been told I don’t? Would I have quit writing?
writer's voice
http://www.thesaleslion.com/debate-employee-company-voice-content-marketing/
I wonder if someone ever told Pete Rose that hitting a baseball took talent. Did they tell him either you have it or you don’t? Did someone ever try to discourage him from playing the game he loved? If they did, he showed them—and everybody—what can be accomplished without innate ability.

My reason for writing this post is to remind you that obstacles can be overcome with hard work. If you love to write, write! If someone says you don’t have Voice, dig deeper and work harder. You might just find that you can make up for what is not innate.

12 comments:

  1. It's amazing how far Pete Rose pushed himself without having "natural ability." Thankfully, your "Voice" succeeded in giving me hope. Though I was never told I had "Voice," someone once said that I gave "good phone." Does that count?!

    Julie

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    1. Everything counts if you do what you love and give it your all. Happy writing!

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  2. So agree with you. We can learn, even voice, if we work at it.

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    1. Absolutely! We might need to dig a little deeper or work extra hard, but if you have a passion for writing, WRITE!

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  3. I don't have natural voice. I guess I should've quit long ago, huh?

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    1. Like Pete Rose, aren't you glad you didn't?

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  4. What wonderful bonding opportunities with your father. I had the same with my grandmother. Going to Cardinals games with her are among my fav memories of her. I know that isn't the point of your post, but I wanted to share how you made me think of her.

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    1. Thanks for telling me that. It's amazing the things that can spark a memory. And also how a memory can add love to an activity. Dad's gone now, but he's always beside me at a Reds game.

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  5. I am hoping you are right. I've never had a paid critique with an editor or an agent than included a single positive comment. I don't get them any more. I work instead.

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    1. The work will pay off. It took me 39 years to get a contract offer. Just keep at it. And love what you do.

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  6. I think it is possible to find your writing voice and I've written about it on my blog. Like Pete we should not depend on talent alone. When we are kids we don't think about how much talent we have; we just do it. Something to think on :-)

    Anna from Shout with Emaginette

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    1. Excellent advice, Anna. And even the greatest natural talents (whether singers, musicians, actors, or writers) benefit from training & practice, practice, practice.

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